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Monday 15 April 2013
Opinion TV

small screen sirens: ‘just say yes’ – consent and TV

Sophie Overett
2 comments

**Spoiler Alert** The second season of Girls finished up a few weeks back, tying up what was a pretty mediocre season with Hannah and Adam back together after his champion’s run to her house (that was weird, right?). The pair had spent the entire season foxtrotting around each other whilst she macked on Donald Glover…
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Tuesday 19 February 2013
Featured TV

small screen sirens: the “big” issue

Sophie Overett
One comment

Growing up, one of my favourite shows was Gilmore Girls. It was the sort of wholesome viewing that spoke to the fast-talking, coffee-drinking, small-village-dweller in me, and something I tuned in to weekly with much aplomb. It helped that my mum and sister liked it too, and it grew to encompass the three of us…
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Monday 4 February 2013
Featured TV

small screen sirens: in defence of breaking bad’s skyler white

Sophie Overett
No comments

The nuclear family is a pretty familiar trope to anyone who watches TV. Whether you’re a sitcom fan or streaming HBO, any series with a family at its core is prone to its man-wife-2.5 children dynamic. The husband or the kids generally carry the narrative. They’re brooding heroes or outrageous players, sullen teens or misfits….
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Monday 10 December 2012
Featured TV

small screen sirens: bridezillas

Sophie Overett
No comments

Going to my sister’s place, I always have to steel myself for what’ll be on her TV when I cross the threshold. Whilst she’s a fan of drama series like Game of Thrones, The Tudors and a slew of other historical and fantastical re-imaginings, her devotion to these doesn’t touch that which she has for…
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Monday 19 November 2012
Culture Featured TV

small screen sirens: medical dramas, and why they have no pulse

Sophie Overett
No comments

A few weeks ago, I curled up on the couch prepped to watch the premiere of The Mindy Project, a new half-hour medical dramedy written by and starring the always-charming Mindy Kaling. I’ve been a pretty huge fan of hers since the better days of The Office and to see her in her own project,…
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Tuesday 9 October 2012
Featured TV

small screen sirens: on nudity

Sophie Overett
4 comments

A few months ago, a group of friends and I marathoned the second season of Game of Thrones. I’d been distracted whilst it was airing on Showcase by work and reality and had had to resort to IQ’ing the suckers. It worked out well in the end as we piled onto my couches and watched…
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Tuesday 25 September 2012
Opinion TV

small screen sirens: girls

Sophie Overett
No comments

**Spoiler Alert : If you haven’t seen Girls yet, maybe don’t read this unless you don’t mind spoilers!** ‘Rich girls in the big city’ has proven a tried and true format on television, especially in the last few years. From Sex & the City through to Gossip Girl it feels like we, as a western,…
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Monday 10 September 2012
Film

small screen sirens: why you (and everyone you know) should be watching parks & recreation

Sophie Overett
No comments

There’s something about dramatised politics that makes for compelling TV. The concept is one that’s fascinated me for a long time, especially given our apparent disengagement and dissatisfaction with politics as a nation, and our lack of faith in our leaders to, well, lead. The popularity though of fictionalised government narratives remains huge, from shows…
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Monday 27 August 2012
Culture Featured TV

small screen sirens: slayers, wolves and the supernatural

Sophie Overett
2 comments

Buffy: the Vampire Slayer was a must-watch in my house growing up. My older sister, a diehard fan at the time, would take meticulous care ensuring that the VCR was set up to record for rewatches, and then the two of us, along with my dad, mum, and newborn brother, would collapse on the couch…
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Monday 13 August 2012
Arts

small screen sirens: the newsroom

Sophie Overett
2 comments

There’s something about television that differs from other types of narrative. It’s not like a film, that’s over in 90 minutes, or like a book that you can inhale in a night or meander through across months. Instead it’s like a throwback to serialised narratives in journals from the 1800s, a Dickens-esque approach to storytelling…
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