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friday foodie: what to do about breakfast when you can’t handle it?

800px-Spoonful_of_cereal
I’m not big on breakfast. Don’t get me wrong – I’m big on breakfast foods. Like a lot of people, I could eat pancakes and bacon at any time of the day (and often have). Breakfast for dinner is one of my favourite “I-can-do-this-because-I’m-a-grown-up” perks, and I can’t even count the amount of times I’ve had waffles, eggs and soldiers, or cereal for dinner (the latter obviously in my student days…and when I’m so tired pouring two items in a bowl is the best I can do).

Breakfast foods are so nourishing and comforting, and as your mother likely tells you:  ‘THE MOST IMPORTANT MEAL OF THE DAY’. I get that. I don’t refute that. I wish I was a big “let’s-have-a-healthy-breakfast-first-thing” person, I really honestly truly do.

…but I have two problems:

1. I am not a morning person. My grumpiness in the mornings is legendary. I’m pretty much this kid. I find it difficult to get out of bed in the morning, so I will leave it to the last possible moment and will bargain away anything to get myself  ”five more minutes”. So making breakfast in the morning seems horrendous. Even pouring cereal does because, God Forbid, I might have to talk to one my housemates before 8AM.

2. I feel a little ill in the mornings. When I wake up, I don’t feel hungry, and at many times, slightly nauseous. The last thing I want to do is eat food.

For many years, I just skipped breakfast and grabbed a latte at the first chance I had, and then picked up a Danish around 10 when I started to get hungry. Which, yes, delicious, but as I’ve entered the realm of full-time work and being an “adult”, I’ve also realised I need to start valuing my health.

Breakfast is important – it kick starts your metabolism, and gives you the fuel you need to be energised throughout the day.

I’m not going to advocate you to wake up half an hour earlier and make your breakfast the biggest and most nutrient rich meal of your day, because  it’s just not sustainable for those of us who can’t think straight in the mornings.

So,  I thought I’d provide you with some tips  I’ve picked up, that have gotten me on the eating breakfast everyday bandwagon.

1. When you feel like you can’t eat, make it a Liquid Breakfast. 

Firstly: please put the ‘Up-and-Go’ down’. Even before  articles came up against them, I found the concept pretty weird and gross — something definitely not natural going on there.

Since I walk to work, I sometimes take a home-made smoothie with. I bulk-buy mixed berries, and then wiz them in the blender with almond milk and a tablespoon of a LSA mixture (you could also use Chia seeds or basically any of these breakfast boosters).

I then pour it into a thermos and I’m on my way. It only takes a few minutes, I can have it on the go, and I’m starting my morning off with some goodness.

Another idea could be something I’m yet to try but a friend loves: Drinking Yoghurt.

2. Always Be Prepared

I’ll buy a pack of belVita Breakfast Biscuits and muesli bars (such as Carman’s) and leave a couple of each in my handbag. That way I know that if I’m in a rush, or working on a project and won’t be at my desk, that I’ll have something to start my day off with (and stop me from buying a chocolate croissant).

3. Leaving Food at the Office

Most days I work behind a desk, so I  make sure I keep a pack of muesli or porridge in my office. Then I make it as soon as I get in – which is the key! Don’t check your e-mails first, because next thing you know it’ll be 11AM and you’ll be making a beeline for the communal biscuit jar.

I know none of this is revolutionary advice. But seriously, breakfast is important. So if you find it difficult, try making a couple little changes and make an effort to at least eat something small, and see how it makes you feel.

 

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